Menu
Home Page

Science day 🔬

🔎❤️ THE CIRCULATORY SYSTEM ❤️🔍

Nightingales began their 'Animals including humans' topic by becoming surgeons in our classroom. They dissected hearts and lungs to gain a greater understanding of the circulatory and respiratory system.

Picture 1

We began the day by identifying the organs, arteries and veins that Miss Kay gave to us. We were a bit shocked by the blood and the size of the organs at first but that didn't stop us from getting stuck in! We put on our aprons and gloves and began to take a closer look... 👀

Picture 1
Picture 1
Picture 2
Picture 3
Picture 4

We began by dissecting the trachea. We used scalpels, dissecting scissors and forceps, we had to be extremely accurate with our incisions. We predicted that it would be filled with blood and have 'soft, squishy' walls. Here's what we found...

Picture 1
Picture 2

The trachea was approximately 5 inches long and had lots of bumps inside. Upon further inspection (using our microscopes) we identified this to be cartilage. We learnt that the trachea has 15-20 c-shaped cartilage rings which protect the airway. It connects the larnyx (voice box) to the bronchi in the lungs. We then took a closer look at the lungs. We predicted them to be like empty sacks with air pockets inside, here's what we found...

Picture 1
Picture 2

The lungs were very dense and had lots of tubes inside. We learnt that these tubes were bronchi which then divided into smaller branches called the bronchioles. The bronchioles eventually end in clusters of microscopic air sacs called alveoli where oxygen from the air is absorbed into blood. Carbon dioxide travels from the blood to the alveoli where it can be exhaled. We inflated the lungs using a pump to investigate the process of respiration. 

 

We then began to dissect the hearts... ❤️

The heart consisted of four chambers: two atria at the top and two ventricles at the bottom. We identified the aorta which is the main artery and carries nutrient-rich blood away from the heart. The pulmonary artery was slightly smaller and connected the heart and lungs. We also identified the largest veins that carry blood to the heart; the 'vena cava' which means 'the heart's veins' in Latin. 

 

Picture 1
Picture 2

We learnt about the importance of keeping healthy when we looked at an unhealthy heart and lungs which were covered in fat. We then investigated the effect of exercise on pulse rate by measuring our pulse before and after exercise. 

Picture 1

In the afternoon we identified the four main components in the blood and their functions. We identified plasma, red blood cells, white blood cells, and platelets. We then created a 'beaker of blood' by choosing food items to represent each of the components. The children used their maths learning on ratio and measure to calculate how much of each component to add. 

Picture 1
Top